MFA Thesis

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Photo Ashley Gillanders

Description

MFA Thesis Exhibition
Sullivan Galleries,
School of the Art Institute of Chicago
April 28th-May 17th
Performed at 7.30pm

‘Activated’ during a critical mass of viewership on opening night, Performative Sculpture II was stuffed with freshly made dough in a back room and placed into position by gallery attendants for the audience to witness its journey of rising or birthing. This work considers the building as body, the dough as bodily fluids & creates possibilities of direct interaction with the architecture of space while claiming the area by disrupting the space on the other side of the wall. Amato’s Performative Sculpture series are in direct dialogue with Gordon Matta-Clarks “building cuts” which re-conceptualized preconditioned roles & relationships.

Artist Statement
I connect my practice through an interdisciplinary artistic dialogue between performance, video, sculpture, photography, painting, and drawing. Driven by process and directed by the work itself, I translate my corporeal experience: the way it moves, the way it feels, the way it is observed by others and perceived by the self and its temporal relationship to the world.
As a material focus, my particular interest in using bread dough as metaphor within my practice, is its life cycle; once activated by warm water and sugar, the cells of yeast split and divide, similarly to when an egg is fertilized by sperm. There is a peak moment when dough is voluptuous, full, and ripe, just before it begins to ‘die’. The ephemeral qualities allows for representations of birth, growth, aging, death, & decay alongside the temporal nature of time, sexuality and bodily limits.
Through the materiality of dough, my research is concretized, viewed through an emotional, psychological and/or corporeal lens that is deeply rooted in psychoanalytical thinking, feminist theory and the complexities of female heterosexuality within a patriarchal system.